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Connecticut Failure to Diagnose Brain Cancer Attorneys

In essence, there are two types of brain cancer: primary brain cancer, which originates in the brain itself; and metastatic brain cancer, in which the cancer originates in another part of the body, usually the central nervous system (CNS). Whether malignant or benign, many brain tumors can be effectively treated if they are diagnosed early enough. Given the nature of certain CNS malignancies, however, early errors in diagnosis and treatment can lead to metastasis with disastrous results for the patient.

At Tooher Wocl & Leydon, LLC, we have helped medical malpractice victims throughout Connecticut with our experience and skill investigating delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis claims against the physicians responsible for the injury or death.

By the time our medical malpractice complaint is ready to file, our lawyers will have identified the particular errors of commission and omission that occurred in your family's brain cancer case. Our consulting medical experts will have established evidence of causation that shows how specific departures from applicable standards of care led to identifiable harm. Our familiarity with the demands of medical negligence litigation in Connecticut can help place responsibility for your family's loss where it belongs.

When a primary care physician misses the signs of brain cancer or too hastily dismisses a brain tumor as an explanation for a patient's symptoms, our lawyers can explore the possibility of the injured party's legal compensation.

Bridgeport Brain Cancer Misdiagnosis Attorneys

There are several recognized symptoms of the brain cancer, which include:

  • Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Changes in hearing, vision or ability to talk
  • Problems with balance or walking
  • Cognitive difficulties (e.g., memory problems, inability to concentrate)
  • Involuntary muscle activity (e.g., jerking, twitching)
  • Numbness or tingling in the arms or legs

When any of these symptoms can be proven to be the early signs of a primary or metastatic brain cancer, the main legal issue is: Could the patient's death or disability from cancer in the brain or CNS have been prevented through a timely diagnosis of the malignancy?

Our investigation of this issue involves close collaboration with oncologist's, neurologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, pediatricians, pathologists and others who can review the medical records for signs of negligence. Did the primary care doctor order the right tests? Did the radiologist correctly interpret and report CT or MRI results? Did the treating physician or surgeon understand the findings and order appropriate treatment? Was the patient given proper follow-up instructions?

Clear Presentation of the Evidence of Negligence in Brain Cancer Cases

An important key to our law firm's success on behalf of Connecticut medical malpractice victims is our ability to synthesize complex medical evidence with legal theories of negligence, causation and damages in clear and persuasive terms. Our first job is to convince a medical malpractice liability insurer of the strength and value of our client's claim. If the settlement process does not yield a fair offer of compensation, our courtroom skill and experience is needed to obtain full, fair and complete damages from a jury.

Our track record of success in the resolution of medical negligence claims has given Tooher Wocl & Leydon, LLC, a statewide reputation for excellence. Our practical ability to investigate and present malpractice claims with the requisite level of detail helps make us a frequent referral choice for other attorneys who are familiar with the success we have achieved for previous clients.

If misdiagnosis, delayed diagnosis or failure to diagnose brain cancer might have played a role in the death or disability of a member of your family, contact an experienced medical malpractice attorney at our offices in Stamford or Bridgeport.

We represent clients statewide and handle all of our medical malpractice cases on a contingency basis. There are no legal fees to pay unless we win.